Lee in the Mountains

Doing the Lord's Work by Saving the White Race

I guess, most White people will just eat the crap, that is put into their mouth.

Right now, in the Forced Union, @ 100% of the corn, 60% of the soybeans and rice are Genetically Modified (GMO). Meat animals are starting to be cloned, and if GMOed dont get ya, Salmonellaed Mexican Tomatoes will.

Are there any small significant number of Whites, outside the Amish, who not just think BUT DO? Do anything significant for themselves, besides consume? Well, we aint eating ANY of this. By God’s providence, we feed our own, we do NOT want Their food or anything else They have for us. Wake up and smell the genocide/famine. Sic Semper Tyrannis!

Food Shortage Recasts Image of ‘Organic’

By KAREN RICHARDSON
June 25, 2008

The salad days of organic salad are wilting in favor of high-tech tomatoes.

As global food shortages threaten to ignite social and economic instability from Nigeria to India, the popular aversion to genetically modified foods is turning into more of a luxury for the wealthy than a practical option for the masses.

This trend is evident in the share price and earnings growth of Monsanto, the world leader in agricultural biotechnology by market share. Its stock has soared 22% this year, trading at a breathless 37 times estimated 2008 per-share earnings. On Wednesday, the company is expected to report a third-quarter profit of $1.39 a share, up 35% from a year earlier.

Gourmets’ fears of “frankenfoods” that make corn taste like cardboard seem to be taking a back seat to the growing global demands of feeding emerging middle classes in developing countries with limited natural resources.

Monsanto’s seeds produce insect-resistant, drought-tolerant crops. It has pledged to double crop yields by 2030 for corn, soybeans and cotton and to reduce the need for water, land and energy by 30%, an effort to position itself as a solution to concerns about mounting strain on the globe’s natural resources.

The firm is in a strong position. Farmers who want to raise their yields of corn for feed or ethanol have to pay the price, while buyers of that corn have to eat it. Monsanto has already increased its earnings outlook several times this year because of demand and higher prices.

It stands in stark contrast to Whole Foods Market, the supermarket for all things organic. It is a price taker that can’t easily pass higher costs to its customers. From 2001 to the end of 2006, the company’s earnings grew an average annual rate of 25%. In 2007, earnings were down more than 10%, and they’re falling further.

Engineered food is clearly getting an upper hand.

In Fed Statement, Where Does ‘Risk’ Hide?

Wednesday’s key word is “risk.”

The Federal Reserve will likely leave short-term interest rates alone at the end of a two-day policy meeting. Investors will hang on how the Fed announces its decision, looking for clues in its policy statement about what the central bank will do next.

These announcements usually follow a template: A discussion of what’s happening with the economy and inflation, a brief statement on the risks to both and often a hint as to whether the Fed is leaning toward raising, cutting or leaving rates alone.

If policy makers are more inclined to raise rates, they might flag “upside risks to inflation” or say the “predominant policy concern” is the risk that inflation won’t calm down. They used similar language last year. Or, if they’re in easier money mode, they might say “downside risks” to growth remain, as they did in March.

Neither is likely. Instead, policy makers will probably echo their language on April 30, when they avoided talking about risk altogether, except the obvious statement that easy money would “mitigate risks to economic activity.” Anything more might box them in. And right now, they don’t seem to have a clear path in mind.

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